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Re: worried about Colin (again) [updated: no longer worried]

Posted: Sun Aug 10, 2014 11:47 pm
by asiab3
amskeptic wrote:For such a horrid life, that full moonlit drive through the mountains of Montana was amazingly gorgeous. We wafted along the highway in and out of the cool shadows of the peaks, our taillights a phosphorescent display of the pulse of civilization.
The moonlit drives through the foothills north of Los Angeles last night and tonight have been simply Divine. It's hard to find words to justify why I drove four times the distance required in six times the duration, but one look out the windshield and even if you did have words, they would be forgotten.

Re: worried about Colin (again)

Posted: Mon Aug 11, 2014 5:10 pm
by Amskeptic
tewa3240 wrote:I always wondered what would happen if one kept driving across the country in an antique bus, repairing antique buses parked across
the country. Alternator got ya, but it WAS whispering before it got you! :joker:
Whispering? Yowling. Piteously. For weeks, it was just a little whistle early in the morning. I thought it was the auxiliary air regulator playing flute. The sound stopped reliably within three minutes of a cold start. The last day, however, it was singing constantly . . .

Here's the thing. I was brazenly confident in this bus because of the memory of the Road Warrior's astonishing 419,000 miles on its original alternator. This junky new '78 was not made of the same stuff! This bearing seized due to what I believe was an inadequate initial charge of lubricant:

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The yowling was from the shell of the bearing (still stuck on the rotor) spinning in the housing that it once was pressed into. The brushes got hateful from what, severe dusty conditions? I did 26 years of dirt roads with the Road Warrior.The slip ring diameter of this alternator was not even close to the minimum 31.5mm:

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Here we are in Minnesota with Silty still hanging in there . . . 9,100,000 successful rotations so far.
Colin

Re: worried about Colin (again)

Posted: Mon Aug 11, 2014 5:19 pm
by Amskeptic
BellePlaine wrote:The 13th is just fine by me, better even.
See ya then!
Colin
(grifftenstein is tomorrow, the 12th)

IAC in Anaconda Montana (formerly: worried about Colin)

Posted: Wed Aug 13, 2014 10:45 am
by whc03grady
The morning started off with an extended discussion among the adults in the house about hospital birth (our first daughter) vs. home birth (our second daughter). Details were shared, eggs were eaten, coffee was dranken. Drank. Drinked.

Ludwig's old fuel pump, one of those boxy CLACKITYCLACKCLACKITYCLICKCLACK types, fell off its perch toward the end of our last trip. Luckily I had a spare whirrrrzwhirrrrywhirrwhirrz pump, which after some contemplation we mounted high up in the crook where the rear seatbelts mount, except, you know, on the outside of the car. Someone (unclear who) mounted one of the fuel filters backward, which provided necessary comic relief (especially since we'd just been over that).
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We had to use two fuel filters, actually, because the nipples on the pump are too big for the hose that runs from the tank, and to the carbs. So it goes 5mm out of the tank to filter A, big 'Mrcn hose from filter A to pump, big 'Mrcn hose from pump to filter B, 5mm out of filter B to carbs. Okay.
Love that new pump sound. That is, lack of sound.
Along with the new pump, we installed a relay such that the pump only runs when the engine runs, and not merely when the key is on as it had been before. Being morbid, I like the idea that after I roll the damn thing, as I lose consciousness my thought will be "at least the pump isn't still pumping gas all over the kids in the back seat". Yeah, that's how my mind works.

An unresolved mystery is why the heater tube on the passenger side was half melted but there was no evidence of fire. Scary stuff. (Sorry, no picture.)

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We moved on to some minor carb tuning, mostly to accommodate the lack of a working brake booster (I still have one Satchmo graciously gave me and which I ungraciously have yet to install). We also green loctited all three solenoids to the carbs, as they were having backing out issues.

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Ludwig's front tires, the overly vaunted (formerly by me as well) Hankook RA08s, have worn in a way that indicated (now watch me get this wrong) too much negative camber; wear on the insides. They also had (now watch me get this wrong) too much toe in, which we also adjusted. I had no idea these adjustments were so relatively simple. Colin also explained in much-needed detail how I will install a new center pin.

Lastly we did a cursory investigation of the brake lights' anomalous behavior. Headlights off, everything's copacetic. Headlights on, and on the pass. side the parking light and reverse lights light up, dimly. Time was short and I have to do things myself anyway, so I got Colin's best diagnosis.

And then a little after 7, I think, he made his way toward Minnesota--with us, he's always coming from or going to Minnesota.

Re: IAC in Anaconda Montana (formerly "worried about Colin")

Posted: Fri Aug 15, 2014 12:51 am
by Lanval
lovely, all-too-brief glimpses of small-town Montana. Yours is glorious country, sir. Now, ahem... keep to bus and diagnose those electrical issues. Easy to do with patience and a decent voltmeter.

ML

Re: IAC in Anaconda Montana (formerly "worried about Colin")

Posted: Fri Aug 15, 2014 8:21 am
by Randy in Maine
I wonder if Colin's alternator was still under warranty?

Re: IAC in Anaconda Montana (formerly "worried about Colin")

Posted: Fri Aug 15, 2014 9:31 am
by Jivermo
Last month...it expired last month.

Re: IAC in Anaconda Montana (formerly "worried about Colin")

Posted: Sat Aug 16, 2014 8:21 am
by Amskeptic
Jivermo wrote:Last month...it expired last month.
It sits in pieces in the back of the BobD, just above Silty The AutoCrossed Alternator. Its diode plate shall be harvested as the need arises. So shall the other bearing which is FINE. So may the stator, who knows what the future may throw my way when it comes to failure.
Ridiculously, the utterly mangled pulley, the yanked and bent and beaten and viciously filed pulley, just spins away imperturbably back there, it has given the belt no grief in the past two thousand miles.
Last night, Silty reminded me that it has had a life long before I met it, the headlamps did a dizzy dimming deal that spontaneously cleared up. We're all on probation here in the BobD . . .
Colin

Re: IAC in Anaconda Montana (formerly "worried about Colin")

Posted: Fri Nov 23, 2018 3:47 pm
by Amskeptic
Update!
Silty The AutoCrossed Alternator now has an additional 8,990 miles and is running fine.