Post From an IAC Second-timer

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BusBassist
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Post From an IAC Second-timer

Post by BusBassist » Thu Jun 13, 2019 9:24 pm

This was my second IAC appointment and it was just as informative and productive as last year's visit from Colin.

I had an ambitious list of tasks - and while I 'hoped' we could get all this work done, my gut told me we would probably run into some stumbling block that might slow us down.

I was hoping we could:
Replace the master cylinder
Replace the servo
Replace the rear backing plates
Replace the rear wheel cylinders
Replace the CV boots
AND - have Colin help me diagnose an intermittent bucking/hesitation issue with my engine.

I set up the night before by loosening the rear brakes and chocking the wheels. For several days, I also applied ample amounts of penetrating oil on the axle nuts, wheel cylinder bolts, and brake line nuts in hopes of avoiding problems with disassembly.

Colin arrived and we chatted for a bit, getting caught up and going over work plans for the day. We had perfect weather with ample sunshine, comfortable temperatures, and NO RAIN in sight.

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We decided to attack the servo/master cylinder project first. My bus came with the wrong servo (perhaps from a Vanagon) and at last year's visit, Colin helped me realize that my master cylinder was shot. See my post from last year:
viewtopic.php?f=77&t=13677

Because the servo was not original (and larger than a stock Type 2), it proved a little tricky to extract it from under the tie rods. We worked with care to separate the reservoir from the old MC. Luckily, separation occurred without damage or structural compromise to all of the components. We then removed the MC and moved out from under the car to prep the new parts for installation.

As we prepped my new (well - used) servo - purchased from a parts bus, we discovered that one of the felt filters was missing. However, when we looked at the photo of the missing part in the Bently, I realized that I had a good and workable substitute - I ran to my attic and opened up my drum set hardware case and removed a thick felt washer from a cymbal stand. It was almost a perfect fit, complete with a correct sized center hole.
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With the new felt filter installed, we wrestled with the servo for a while, checking its functionality. Colin did some razor blade surgery to make sure the mating surface that receives the MC was clean and void of any imperfections.

We then turned our attention to the MC to do a bench bleed and got it ready for installation. This went well - and then my wife called us in for lunch.

After some lasagna, salad, and home made cookies- we commenced our work. Colin reminded me how important it was that the brake line nuts line up exactly with the ports on the MC. He carefully manipulated the lines until each was precisely aligned in the correct position and the new install can be seen below:

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- We connected the lines and then connected the vacuum hose to the servo.
Again, because of the non-original servo that we removed, I did not have a connecting hose from the servo nipple to the breathing hose that runs under the drivers seat. I did not have a suitable substitute so we climbed into Naranja Westy and drove to the Home Depot and picked up a clear vinyl hose to make this connection.

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The fit was a little tight so I used my wife's hair dryer to make the hose more pliable. Finally, after some gentle persuasion, the hose fit over the nipple to complete the connection.

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After all this work we decided to address the rear brakes. We also determined that it was not necessary to replace the backing plates and moved on to replace the wheel cylinders. We started with the left rear since it had sprung a leak just a few days prior. The drum came right off and we removed the shoes and springs. Colin took the drum to clean it as a result of the leaking fluid. He gave the me the assignment to removed the wheel cylinder - AND THIS IS WHERE THE TROUBLE STARTED.

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I applied my rookie skills as best I could without success and then Colin suggested a few of his tried and true removal methods. And I'm sorry to report that the brake line nut simply REFUSED to release. The day was getting long so Colin suggested that instead of replacing the compromised cylinder, that we rebuild it. SO - we harvested the two pistons from my newly purchased wheel cylinder and spent time honing and prepping the old cylinder. After reassembly and bleeding, I am very happy to report that the brake system on my bus is vastly improved.


The day was closing out but Colin addressed my engine bucking issue. He checked the electrical components and they were healthy. He then turned his attention to the single carb - and as occurred last year, this carb proved to the be the source of frustration and the cause of the bucking. SO I'll have to either rebuild it or replace it with the proper duals.


Before Colin took his leave, we coaxed him into the house where he played our piano for a few minutes:

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This was a great day. My bus is working better and Colin helped me prioritize other tasks to bring it into better health.

And, it was great to have my neighbor Randy (Judahthedog) also have a day to work with Colin. I stopped by today and watched them work. Too bad the weather was less kind.

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Late 73 Bay w/a transplanted 914 Engine.

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asiab3
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Re: Post From an IAC Second-timer

Post by asiab3 » Thu Jun 13, 2019 11:55 pm

Thanks for posting! Looks like a fun day; do you remember what exactly the carb was doing to be deemed unsatisfactory?

Robbie
1969 bus, "Buddy."
145k miles with me.
322k miles on Earth.

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BusBassist
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Re: Post From an IAC Second-timer

Post by BusBassist » Fri Jun 14, 2019 3:48 am

per the carb - you're stretching my terminology here but I think it's running too rich, as evidenced by black smoke and black soot on the inside of the tail pipe. And when we turned the mixture screw (which should have killed the engine), it kept running. Colin thinks I need to do a rebuild.

Thanks,

Jeff
Late 73 Bay w/a transplanted 914 Engine.

Jivermo
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Re: Post From an IAC Second-timer

Post by Jivermo » Fri Jun 14, 2019 4:56 am

Terrific writeup! I liked the cymbal felt save! We do what we must.

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BusBassist
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Re: Post From an IAC Second-timer

Post by BusBassist » Sat Jun 15, 2019 4:21 pm

I will follow up later with more detail per the MC replacement as there was variance with the port location when comparing the old to the New. This issue came up in my post from last year and there were a few comments from other IAC-ites.

Jeff
Late 73 Bay w/a transplanted 914 Engine.

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BusBassist
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Re: Post From an IAC Second-timer

Post by BusBassist » Tue Jun 18, 2019 8:16 pm

OK - Here's my follow up.

When Colin visited in 2018, he helped me realize that my MC was shot. I found a new ATE MC for $89 but was concerned that the price was too good to be true. But - I took a chance and purchased the part. Other IAC-ites Curtp07 and Happyfolk also mentioned they purchased this part from the same vendor. When the part arrived, we discovered that the brake light ports on the new ATE MC were not in the same position as the original. While the front port matched the original, the rear port was situated concentrically so that the switch would not contact the e-brake cable as seen here:

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The new MC came with parallel ports BUT - also had a fifth port at the back:

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I was concerned that by using the rear port, there might not be enough clearance between the brake light switch and the heater hose. However, I am glad to report that I was able to install the brake light switch at the rear of the MC and use a bolt sent by the seller to seal up the unused port. You can see that the rear brake light switch comes into contact with the heater hose, but it is minimal and the hose it flexible enough to 'receive' the switch.

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With a new Master Cylinder, Servo, and rebuilt rear wheel cylinder, the brake system is working magnificently - and the bus is a joy to drive with great stopping control and sensitivity.
Late 73 Bay w/a transplanted 914 Engine.

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Amskeptic
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Re: Post From an IAC Second-timer

Post by Amskeptic » Wed Jun 19, 2019 7:15 am

jeff did a fine job of hitting the details of our visit, so I will just add some photographs.

Did I mention that Jeff can scare up a fine breakfast at moment's notice? Jeff sure can scare up a fine breakfast at a moment's notice.

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I am less school-teacher-ish when my customers graduate to journeyman mechanic status and Jeff certainly has. Jeff tore into the master cylinder replacement while I admired the lines of his blue and white VW bus:

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I was jonesing for his old brake booster since mine was failing by the mile. Sadly, his was a bodged unit from a Vanagon or something, and I wasn't about to customize NaranjaWesty. Rear brake cylinder did stop me cold at the point of metallurgical irreversible consequence, what with the visegrips about to tear up the compression fitting. So, it seemed logical to let the wheel cylinder stay and just hone it and hope that the new parts would take to the old cylinder. Here's Jeff considering such a thing:

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It was a victorious test drive ... mostly. The brakes were at a quantum new level, but the carburetor had gone rogue. IT decides how much fuel the engine gets, and no silly little mixture screw is going to dissuade it from dumping gobs of gas into the engine. Sure were nice brakes though. And though it is flattering to read that I "played the piano", I merely did a quick check of the tune. I am a mechanic, remember. His spouse, on the other hand, now she can play the piano ... and make excellent cookies.
BobD - 78 Bus . . . 112,660 miles
Chloe - 70 bus . . . 206,845 miles
Naranja - 77 Westy . . . 116,898 miles
Pluck - 1973 Squareback . . . . . . 55,570 miles
Alexus - 91 Lexus LS400 . . . 84,465 miles

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