Oh, man...do I ever get sick of seeing this...

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Amskeptic
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Re: Oh, man...do I ever get sick of seeing this...

Post by Amskeptic » Mon Sep 11, 2017 11:08 pm

Responded . . .
Colin
(Amskeptical •Sep 12, 2017 12:08 am
This may be useless to the readership here, but classic VW owners, would you PLEASE replace your fuel hoses with only correct 5mm hose for carbureted, and 7.3mm reinforced hose for fuel injected models? Please? These cars are too wonderful to suffer these needless negligent deaths.)
BobD - 1978 Bus . . . . . . . . . . .111,130 miles
Chloe - 1970 bus . . . . . . . . . . . 206,787 miles
Naranja - 1977 Westfalia . . . . . 94,615 miles
Pluck - 1973 Squareback . . . . . 55,510 miles
Alexus - 1991 Lexus LS400 . . . 72,990 miles

Jivermo
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Re: Oh, man...do I ever get sick of seeing this...

Post by Jivermo » Tue Sep 12, 2017 5:49 am

Great! Maybe it will remind someone out there.

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wcfvw69
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Re: Oh, man...do I ever get sick of seeing this...

Post by wcfvw69 » Tue Sep 12, 2017 7:35 am

It would appear that my attempt at humor on my previous post was deleted. :(

My STRONG opinion is these fires on type 1 engine powered buses is caused the majority of the time by inlet/outlet tubes coming out of the pump or carb. I restore and resell the original German VW Pierburg fuel pumps. On a 1/3 of them, I find one or both of the inlets loose in the body of the pump. Why? Because people pull and yank the fuel lines off vs. simply cutting the hose at the inlet/outlet tubes to relieve the gripping pressure on the tubes. The other factor is the vast majority of the aftermarket carbs and fuel pumps tubes are not well installed in the carb or fuel pumps. It doesn't take much to loosen them. The Airtek pumps that most FLAPS sell are notorious for having loose inlets/outlet tubes.

There was also a recent thread on The Samba where a poster admitted stupidity. He had hung a plastic fuel filter on his fuel line between the fuel pump and the carb. The weight of the heavy fuel filter gradually pulled the inlet out of the carb which then sprayed his entire engine compartment with fuel. His engine quit but he was very luck in that it didn't catch fire.

Yes, people need to use the 5mm fuel line. Yes, they need to check the condition of the fuel hose every couple of years. BUT, don't overlooked the security of the inlet/outlet tubes on the fuel pump and carb either.
1970 Westfalia bus. Stock 1776 dual port type 1 engine. Restored German Solex 34-3. Restored 205Q distributor, restored to factory appearance engine.

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Amskeptic
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Re: Oh, man...do I ever get sick of seeing this...

Post by Amskeptic » Tue Sep 12, 2017 8:57 am

wcfvw69 wrote:
Tue Sep 12, 2017 7:35 am
It would appear that my attempt at humor on my previous post was deleted. :(

My STRONG opinion is these fires on type 1 engine powered buses is caused the majority of the time by inlet/outlet tubes coming out of the pump or carb. I restore and resell the original German VW Pierburg fuel pumps. On a 1/3 of them, I find one or both of the inlets loose in the body of the pump. Why? Because people pull and yank the fuel lines off vs. simply cutting the hose at the inlet/outlet tubes to relieve the gripping pressure on the tubes. The other factor is the vast majority of the aftermarket carbs and fuel pumps tubes are not well installed in the carb or fuel pumps. It doesn't take much to loosen them. The Airtek pumps that most FLAPS sell are notorious for having loose inlets/outlet tubes.

There was also a recent thread on The Samba where a poster admitted stupidity. He had hung a plastic fuel filter on his fuel line between the fuel pump and the carb. The weight of the heavy fuel filter gradually pulled the inlet out of the carb which then sprayed his entire engine compartment with fuel. His engine quit but he was very luck in that it didn't catch fire.

Yes, people need to use the 5mm fuel line. Yes, they need to check the condition of the fuel hose every couple of years. BUT, don't overlooked the security of the inlet/outlet tubes on the fuel pump and carb either.
Well, that too. And what is your solution for re-securing the brass nipples in the potmetal castings? Gasoline/ethanol environment and all . . .
Colin
BobD - 1978 Bus . . . . . . . . . . .111,130 miles
Chloe - 1970 bus . . . . . . . . . . . 206,787 miles
Naranja - 1977 Westfalia . . . . . 94,615 miles
Pluck - 1973 Squareback . . . . . 55,510 miles
Alexus - 1991 Lexus LS400 . . . 72,990 miles

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wcfvw69
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Re: Oh, man...do I ever get sick of seeing this...

Post by wcfvw69 » Tue Sep 12, 2017 12:01 pm

Amskeptic wrote:
Tue Sep 12, 2017 8:57 am


Well, that too. And what is your solution for re-securing the brass nipples in the potmetal castings? Gasoline/ethanol environment and all . . .
Colin
http://na.henkel-adhesives.com/product- ... 7931798529

I've also used JB Weld to re secure the tubes in the carb and pump bodies. With the tube out, I like to clean it well, then sand the area of the tube that goes into the body with 220 to put a 'tooth' on the surface. I also put a tooth inside the opening where the tube lives then flush the area well again with carb or brake cleaner. Apply just a very small smear of JB Weld or sleeve retainer on the tube and then insert it back in the body and tap it home.

As my Dad use to say "if that comes out, it deserves too". Of course, the tubes will not come out again. Others have installed threaded barb fittings for the carb inlet like Volkzbitz does when requested on his restored Solex carbs.
1970 Westfalia bus. Stock 1776 dual port type 1 engine. Restored German Solex 34-3. Restored 205Q distributor, restored to factory appearance engine.

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