Stock 1776 Build for 71 Bus

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blue72beetle
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Re: Stock 1776 Build for 71 Bus

Post by blue72beetle » Fri Oct 11, 2019 1:17 pm

I haven't tried anything yet, I'm on a trip away from home. The only thing I did was replace the carb, the pump had previously worked ever since I got the bus.

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Re: Stock 1776 Build for 71 Bus

Post by blue72beetle » Thu Jun 11, 2020 12:53 pm

asiab3 wrote:
Sat Jul 01, 2017 7:53 am
Yes, the current engine has the largest end-play I've ever seen in a car that still drives. I don't think there are any shims in it at all.
Finally pulled the engine... Broke my 36mm socket trying to get the gland nut off... waited to get the torque multiplier tool in the mail...

Drumroll............. There were 3 shims in there. I'm going to go pick up a digital caliper and dial indicator today so I can see what sizes they are.

A few weeks ago I bought a freshly rebuilt 1776 longblock. Which would be the better direction? Try some different shims to get the end play on this 1600 back towards something correct, or just go build up the 1776? I'm leaning towards just building the 1776. I've already got it... plus a freshly rebuilt Volksbitz carb, a rebuilt fuel pump from Bill, and an NOS 205Q.

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blue72beetle
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Re: Stock 1776 Build for 71 Bus

Post by blue72beetle » Thu Jun 11, 2020 5:49 pm

Well I've been reading up on end play, and I don't think there's any point to using the 1600 anymore. With that much play, all I would be doing is just beating up the case more.

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asiab3
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Re: Stock 1776 Build for 71 Bus

Post by asiab3 » Fri Jun 12, 2020 3:24 am

I suspect your case is already beat to hell. When it’s split, get a micrometer reading of the #1 main bearing case saddle width and the actual width of the bearing. We want to know how much play was actual end play, (fixable,) and how much was bearing-in-case movement, (rebuild and machine work required.)

I believe the standard “thrust measurements” of a Type 1 case are 22, 21, and 20 millimeters. So the case could be machined if the case surface is not warped, and the #1 case saddle measures thicker than 20mm. (Citation needed.)

You can also check this by installing a 4th shim to lock the flywheel/crank and bearing together, which will allow you to test for bearing movement exactly like reading end play. Flywheel gland nut at least 25-30 ft* lbs for this.

Grit, dirt, or bad machining can cause the bearing to wear excessively. Many Type 1 engines suffer this fate, from some combination of dirt, grit, bad assembly, and/or poor clutch technique.

Save the case for a rainy day. Good used cases aren’t too expensive yet, and new ones don’t seem to be machined well enough to justify the cost. Strip it down, taking GOOD photos of all parts along the way.

I am a fan of installing the “ready” engine now, and getting some good shakedown miles in. That will give you time and headspace to build a better engine, all the while finding out little things about your bus. (My good friend just built his first engine, and drove his bus for the first time in eight years. He’s been towed three times this month because non-engine things keep goofing off. Purrs like a kitten though!) Waiting on parts/tools is a great time to take stock of other things that compliment a reliable power plant, like throttle/clutch cables, CV joints/boots, brakes, etc..

Robbie
1969 bus, "Buddy."
145k miles with me.
322k miles on Earth.

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